About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
FBC 19
MSNBCW 13
CNBC 4
CNNW 2
LANGUAGE
English 41
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
voices to help educate people. we have so many screaming people on both sides of the equation, and we're not making enough progress. >> dr. carson, i watched you, and we've been on the show before, for which i am grateful, and i've watched you on other shows and have been reading about you. it looks like you are a problem solver and looking for common ground. i get that. that's probably something lacking in this country. i just had a thought on the economy. if you take a look at unemployment rates, overall, 7.7% is not the worst thing in the world, but four years after the recovery, it should be lower. here's the ones that are killers, and i just want to get your thoughts on how to solve it. teenage employment in the usa, total teenage employment, 25%. overall black employment, 13.8%. and the worst one is teenage black employment, 43%. how in the world can we solve those problems, sir? >> it's going to take a concerted effort. first of all, we as a society need to recognize for every one of those young people we can keep from going on the path of despair, that's one more tax paying pr
. that is probably not fair. some will get jobs because of your education but many will pay $200,000 and get little more than that. this is why dale stephens dropped out and has the web site uncollege.org and his book hack education. what do you mean? there is a reason people go to college. >> that is what society says you need to do but that means you have to learn what they tell you the not what you want to interest you. john: i just wt comic books and girls i wouldn't have learned anything. >> maybe you start a comic book about girls. [laughter] >> you tell me your doing better? >> there is a community around the world who is actively doing creative things with their education one dropped out now is an artist and getting commissions. summer building solar powered computers but without paying the high cost of college. i did not go to middle school or high school. john: your parents let you leave school? >> they were not fans of the idea but i thought if i leave for one year what is the big loss? if i go back school will be there. john: you even took college courses? you could just not pay? >> pro
will get jobs because of your education but many will pay $200,000 and get little more than that. this is why dale stephens dropped out and has the web site uncollege.org and his book hack education. what do you mean? there is a reason people go to college. >> that is what society says you need to do but that means you have to learn what they tell you the not what you want to interest you. john: i just want comic books and girls i wouldn't have learned anything. >> maybe you start a comic book about girls. [laughter] >> you tell me your doing better? >> there is a community around the world who is actively doing creative things with their education one dropped out now is an artist and getting commissions. summer building solar powered computers but without paying the high cost of college. i did not go to middle school or high school. john: your parents let you leave school? >> they were not fans of the idea but i thought if i leave for one year what is the big loss? if i go back school will be there. john: you even took college courses? you could just not pay? >> professors were
are learning a lot. some will get jobs because of your education, but many of you will pay 200,000 dollars and get little more than debt. the reason dale stevens founded the web site uncollege.org. how to get ahead without college. in the book half of your education is sub titled ditch the lectures save ten's of college and learn more than your peers ever will. what do you mean learn more than your peers. there's a reason they go to college. >> they go to college because you are told to. society says this is what you need to do in order to be successful in your life. you have to learn exactly what they tell you not necessarily the things that you want to learn or interest you. >> i just wanted to learn comic books and about girls, i wouldn't have learned anything if i didn't have a college directing me. >> maybe you would have started a comic book about girls. >> people go to your web site and tell you you helped me drop out and i am doing better? >> we have a community of 10,000 people around the world who are doing creative things with your education instead of going to school. there's p
education ends up coming down to money. money is the reason behind the latest and largest school closures in our nations history. chicago is closing 54 schools. can you imagine? it's an effort to shore up the billion dollar budget deficit. as shocking as this sounds, cities are facing similar meesures are in your city could be one of them. could this actually be the best medicine? joining me now is the ceo of the illinois policy institute. >> and the 2010 census, 200,000 africans left and that has been a decades long time. many are declaring that the chicago public school system, which has monopoly control over educational systems is failing. they are leaving. we have these empty schools that have to be closed. melissa: it seems a liitle too easy. some people have been saying that the schools are empty, they are curable schools, is they're not going to be overcrowding? >> chicago's population is in a long-term decline. we have the lowest population that we have had since 1920. it was built from hundreds of thousands of more people. all over the city there is excess capacity. they are movi
an expansion of engineering and science education, talks about reducing the deficit by eliminate willing waste. how concerned should the gop be about mark sanford's ability to win in the palmetto state now? >> i think they should be very concerned. she is a very impressive candidate in her own right. take away who her brother might or might nop not be or is. take away the baggage that mark sanford has, she is an impressive candidate on her own. an important point to make. that being said, it is likely that sanford will have challenges with women voters in a general election. newt gingrich won the primary. >> what are you trying to imply about our state? >> any time we predict what voters can do they go and do the exact opposite. >> especially in south carolina. >> exactly. no question. my point is even with all the things we are talking about, a tough race for sanford, she is such a strong candidate answered does have real baggage to deal w >> katon, you were quoted in politico, it looks to me like governor sanford has a tough hill to climb, not getting 40% have to convince people who didn't v
. they he an effort to balance their budget and they are cutting aid to higher education. metimes up to 75% cuts in one year. 75% of students attend public universities. that is where this is happening. what the gernment is attempting to do is slightly decreased the amount of money they are making off of these students, going from 16% to 11% in fees. they do want to ensure that students are paying back something every month. so that we are preventing the cycle of default which benefits everybody in this process. allowing students were not able to get a job. really predatory loans, interest rates that are higher, refinancing to pay off over time. >> i thnk one of the biggest problem is that we need to increase the qualifications for loans. we need to make it more academics we see students getting into the university system. not everyone benefits from a college education. neil: high school seniors, for example, breaking out. >> is if they are able to thrive in a college environment and their background. we have to make sur that we're putting those students through college. we don't want to f
are not cheap. steve, the directer of the narc institute for early education research at rutgers was consulted by the white house. there's a number, estimated, one the president's plan, that early childhood education could cost up to $10 billion a year, rick. this goes in the line of more spending, more recovery. this is a lot of money. >> well, yeah, but here's the concern. i don't know how you can make the argument that 800,000 civilian defense workers losing their jobs can be good for the economy. i don't quite see how that's possible, and now on spending on preschool, look, what we're looking at now, forget the president's agenda to increase it. we're now looking at a major cut to head start because of the sequester. i don't know if that impacts on the economy today, but you can't tell me this is a good thing for the future when we take away the programs for kids. >> bottom line is, literally, barack obama needs more revenue. he needs another source. he just raised taxes on the risk, talking about closing deductions which is not enough. i'd like to predict they will eventually put another
is education; right? education of using the card in an appropriate fashion. why is that also a key -- a key promise of what you are doing? >> well, we're at an innovation conference, so many innovations and ayments in the marketplace. what's challenging is getting consumers to understand the features and benefits getting them to adopt them. that's what pay perks is ere for, educate consumers about what products and feature are available for them and get them to use them in ways that benefit, again, the value chain. shibani: dozens of companies here, but few run by a female. talk to me about being a woman in this environment, in this lean in time that cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sheryl out now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibani: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the very first stanley cup championship took pl
the victim blame that aren't educated when they go into their jury box. so they still lean -- especially women, they still lean towards the male perpetrators of the violence. so although these tweets certainly help, we also have to educate the people in the jury box. we also have to educate the parents. and especially the academic institutions that hired these coaches, that allowed these coaches to stay, that allowed this whole culture to permeate. >> dr. drew, we have two elements to this. we have many elements, but two specific elements. what happened before the actual incident and during the incident itself, the crime. and then what happened after. everything that everyone posted online, all the blaming of the victim, all the sharing of the videos. and i want to ask you this. >> yeah. >> we as grown-ups seem to have problems stopping and filtering our meanness between our fingers and our tweets. we are doing a terrible job at that. you can just log onto my twitter account and see what people say about me and what kind of words they've used. they've never met me. >> it's brutal, right?
very passionatably as someone that grew up in new york city and bronx. my mom was an educator, worked in parts and administration for the district of education. the vanishing middle class in new york city, it is really a staggering thing to hold. having watched the trajectory of this city, the rising inequality, the losses of middle class jobs and low paying service jobs and then the -- massive increase in the cost of housing. i want to talk about how to stop new york from becoming essentially 1%, 99% city right after this. way the bristles moe to the way they clean, once you try an oral-b deep sweep power brush, you'll never want to go back. its dynamic power bristles reach between teeth to remove up to 76% more plaque than sonic in hard to reach areas. oral-b deep sweep 5000 power brush. >> announcer: did you know there are secret black market websites around the world that sell stolen identities? >> 30-year-old american man, excellent credit rating. >> announcer: lifelock monitors thousands of these sites 24 hours a day. and if we discover any of our members' data for sale, lifeloc
come together and build new opportunities for housing to go in there. we could have adult education programs in there. we could have transitional opportunities for clinics. we could do a lot of things. let's not have a bunch of 52 plus buildings abandoned in our community. we do not need another eyesore. >> we're looking at the zool board voting on this on may 22nd. any chance of them turning back this decision? >> historically when they put out this list, and they put it out every year. we call it the hit list. they have carry through all the closings on the list. in the first six years there was something like 60 schools on the list. last year they were 22. they hit all 22. that being said, they've never done anything on this scale anywhere in the country. and so we're counting on a huge public outcry among people who are invested in the communities. parents, children, educators, all of us to make a stand and say don't do this in our city. don't dismantle our schools in such a scale. and we're prepared to make protests and speak out and hopefully the policymakers will change their
education, we need to make sure we protect medicare and what we've seen and the alternative is they don't do that. that create as voucher program for medicare. >> we certainly agree on the opposition to a recession. senator corker, you going to vote for this budget? >> no, i'm not. i don't expect you think i would. it really doesn't address any of the major issues that we need to be dealing with. there's no entitlement reform. republicans would like to see a 75 year fix for our entitlements so that we'll see, know those will be here down the road. if you want to know the truth, larry, neither budget does the things that need to be done for our country but i will say two nights ago we passed a cr, first time since i've been in the united states senate in six years and to months. i was able to vote for a bill that cut real spending. we'll go through this budget process and the democratic budget obviously as you just mentioned doesn't do what it needs to do. republican budget could do more, maybe there's a remote chance that we have a conference that actually addresses the big issues of the da
. we're trying to urge them to tell the public -- our job is to educate. it's the public's job to decide when they look on the grocery shelf or have the lever on a soda machine which thing to take, which product is in their interest. all we're trying to do is educate and then hopefully if they understand they would be better off with one product or another. they'll make the intelligent choice. >> you could do ads for education as the executive of new york city, you are telling people what they can and cannot do. why is that government's job to do that? >> we're not telling them at all. we're telling them what science says is or isn't in their interest. we allow you to smoke. we just don't let you smoke where other people have to breathe the smoke that you -- that you're exhaling or comes from your cigarette. the same thing with obesity, which incidentally is a public interest because we're going to spend $5 billion on treating people of obesity in our hospitals in new york city alone this year. but regardless -- >> where is the line? where is it too far for government to go? >>
to get out early to get in the real world. education is one of those common goods that oddly keeps rising in price. a big factor is the federal government hands out cheap money to kid who is bome -- they don't need care about cost so i think this is a nice change and hopefully it's copied. >> rick, don't you like it when colleges do step up with a new idea to try to solve this. >> yeah. i think this would be a wonderful idea. i would if it were practical in any way. college of the ozarks has 1200 kids, everyone of them is given the opportunity to work on campus in exchange for tuition. you take that to my alma mater of the ohio state university you can't find 50,000 plus jobs to give kids. it's a great thing for that small school, it couldn't possibly work everywhere. i wish it could. >> but steve, the point is that all these one size fits all solutions don't work. that's what we've seen with obama care and a lot of things. this is for one college and should be emulated if possible because it's working there. >> yes. and other schools can come up with other ways to do the same thing. one
as they were and education and health care, that's what creates the corruption. so shrink government, it shrinks the size and scope and shrink corruption as well. >> wayne, you are huffing and puffing. >> because i don't believe that. if you start locking these guys up and putting them away for good yes, that will stop it. you got five cities in california that are in bankruptcy. you know what that's going to do to the municipal bond market. this money is going to dry up because you have thieves running it. you put them away for good. you electrocute a couple and that will stop it. >> i'm with wayne. look, it's going to make somebody think twice now. for the longest time it's been easy, paying bills, going on vacation and no one notices. now shows like this bring it to the forefront. maybe we're making a difference. >> i'm not condoning electrocuting people for stealing, however, i think the problem here is that they were enabling themselves a lot of money because they were doing it through the system, spiking the pension system. maybe it's time to reform that. >> reform is needed fo
to educate the public, celebrity have free speech too, that is what this boils down to. there is a line 2 between lobbyg and free speech. >> why are they e. exempt. what making them different, they hole up signs that say governor cuomo don't franc new york, they are trying to influence legislation. neil: how would that be different if some of you, and your hea lawyer colleagues wento protesting the same thing, you are not registered, you are speaking on behalf of fellow lawyers. >> neil, i think if we were to get together as a group and raise and spend more than 5,000-dolls, to stop fracking or whatever it may be, we would need to register as lobbyists. neil: groups can spend that aim and more going to washington, d.c. every year for annual right to life march, they would be considered lobbyist. >> this particular group is getting moneying it to particularly influence len legislation, and governor cuomo. under new york statute, because they do that, they meet requirement. neil: i understand, you focus on new york to that point they would be considered lobbyists. >> to that point everyone
spending $13 million on education aid pakistan. that is where the hatred against the u.s. is at record levels. that is just a fraction of the $370 million we spend on all fouraid. and to egypt, i and the country not happy with us. this administration is missing a golden oortunity with this sequester. instead of acting like a two-yearld throwing a temper tantrum, instead of laying people off and closing the white house, why not really look at where the money is going, look at the smart ways we can meet spending requirements. we just ask for the ones you spend your money wisely. because it is our money, now we want to know what you think. should we send money to pakistan while cutting military aid to american soldiers? log onto gerriwillis.com and i will share the results at the end of tonight's show. we will be asking are we facing a new housing bubble? and blaming congress for troubles, is it fair? and what is next for the housing behemoth? behemoth? answers next. today is gonna be an important day for us. you ready? we wanna be our brother's keeper. what's number two we wanna do? brin
educated married mothers find themselves not uninterested in the conversation about having it all, but untouched by it. they are too busy minding their grandmother's old fashioned lives for values. like heirlooms and wear proudly as their own. joining the table is former news anchor campbell brown and editor and chief of "cosmopolitan" magazine and joanne coles is with us and also is katty kay. when you looked as thee numbers and sort of trend that you track here, what is behind it? is it a choice or reality? >> i think this is an economy story. these are not very affluent women who are educated in the ivy league who are fleeing their law firm jobs. these are women whose families are earn much less and in a world where our financial futures are uncertain and we don't know what is going to become of us and you're not making that much money and you've got two little kids and your husband is working all the time, it makes sense to lean out and focus on the home sphere. >> is that what you're finding the women that you interviewed, the one that you interviewed and the women you talked
a conflict in vietnam to research the history. >> that's right, and assuming they're educated, assume they had some education on the vietnam war. how do you miss it? and a b-52 bomber is in a park with a plaque on it. i mean, you have to be an idiot to miss that and so, i'll then say about the young producers they may not have lived during vietnam, but idiotic to have done something like that. >> megyn: the plaque on site talks how the american empire was destroyed and it's unambiguous once you get the translation, i assume, what exactly this stands for and why it was memorialized in the way it is, the wreckage on site. i want to ask you about the overall show, bob, because it wasn't like this is a singular incident in the amazing race episode where they went to vietnam. there was another instance they made the contestants memorize the lyrics to a patriotic vietnamese song and pro communist song and here is some of that, stand by. >> this requires them to watch the performance of a patriotic vietnamese song and they'll reveal the words of a celebrated quote. ♪ >> like one direction
positive. that israel is an economic hub. the palestinians are among the most educated populations in the worldful there is great potential here if these two opposing sides would actually work together. that's why he has been stressing economic development as a possibility. >> now a $40 billion a year mutual trade relationship that dennis ross helped nurture along. thank you, dennis, and i should say nbc middle east adviser in chicago, jeffrey goldberg here. we'll be right back. no. there was that fuzzy stuff on the gouda. [ both ] ugh! when it came to our plants... we were so confused. how much is too much water? too little? until we got miracle-gro moisture control. it does what basic soils don't by absorbing more water, so it's there when plants need it. yeah, they're bigger and more beautiful. guaranteed. in pots. in the ground. in a ukulele. are you kidding me? that was my idea. with the right soil... everyone grows with miracle-gro. ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of
it in five years. rand paul's budget. very quickly, the names of those departments. education and energy, about 73,000 federal employees. >> i think that his budget is reckless and irresponsible. it has no chance of passage. >> i think it is a very good plan. >> i would like to add six federal agencies. >> we have commerce -- books -- energy, hard. [laughter] >> he is just doing a rick perry impression for us to bring back a moment of nostalgia. the a-team is going to be right back with us. more with the a-team leader later in the broadcast. up next, governor cuomo running a helping hand to hollywood. the governor is learning why you don't mess with gun control. not even in new york state. that is coming up next. and liberal activists preventing drivers license from being issued. we are on the case ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds be
of those departments. education and energy, about 73,000 federal employees. >> i think that his budget is reckless and irresponsible. it has no chance of passage. >> i think it is a very good plan. >> i would like to add six federal agencies. >> we have commerce -- books -- energy, hard. [laughter] >> he is just doing a rick perry impression for us to bring back a moment of nostalgia. the a-team is going to be right back with us. more with the a-team leader later in the broadcast. up next, governor cuomo running a helping hand to hollywood. the governor is learning why you don't mess with gun control. not even in new york state. that is coming up next. and liberal activists preventing hey, buddy? oh, hey, flo. you want to see something cool? snapshot, from progressive. my insurance company told me not to talk to people like you. you always do what they tell you? no... try it, and see what your good driving can save you. you don't even have to switch. unless you're scared. i'm not scared, it's... you know we can still see you. no, you can't. pretty sure we can... try snapshot today -- n
departments. education and energy, about 73,000 federal employees. >> i think that his budget is reckless and irresponsible. it has no chance of passage. >> i think it is a very good plan. >> i would like to add six federal agencies. >> we have commerce -- books -- energy, hard. [laughter] >> he is just doing a rick perry impression for us to bring back a moment of nostalgia. the a-team is going to be right back with us. more with the a-team leader later in the broadcast. up next, governor cuomo running a helping hand to hollywood. the governor is learning why you don't mess with gun control. not even in new york state. that is coming up next. that is coming up next. and liberal activists preventing before copd... i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making itard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing betr.
so that the political change can actually stick. earlier, you were talking about brown v education. the fact that it didn't stick, we're avoiding that in the movement. we're telling the stories that stay in people's hearts so that when the laws are passed, they'll stick. >> it's interesting. i think we sometimes down play the cultural piece, but representative lee, you and i were talking in the makeup room that you were the first black cheerleader on your high school team. i'm clapping because i was a high school cheerleader. on one hand, you think what difference does it make if the cheerleading team is integrated? in fact, it does make a difference for us to be participating with one another in these so-called normative spaces in order to like generate that sense of familiarity. >> sure. it makes a big difference. because people have to identify. this is a diverse country, first of all. people have to identify on all fronts and when i went to high school, there were african-american, latino and asian pacific american students. but the criteria, you had to be blond and blue-eyed t
paul's budget. very quickly, the names of those departments. education and energy, about 73,000 federal employees. >> i think that his budget is reckless and irresponsible. it has no chance of passage. >> i think it is a very good plan. >> i would like to add six federal agencies. >> we have commerce -- books -- energy, hard. [laughter] >> he is just doing a rick perry impression for us to bring back a moment of nostalgia. the a-team is going to be right back with us. more with the a-team leader later in the broadcast. up next, governor cuomo running a helping hand to hollywood. the governor is learning why you don't mess wh gun control. not even in new york state. that is coming up next. that is coming up next. and liberal activists preventing all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. st seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. ♪ [
chronicles in his memoir, "valley boy: the education of tom perkins." it is a candid account of his life, his second marriage to romance novelist danielle steel, a manslaughter conviction in a boating accident in france, and the deals that made him so wealthy, starting with the first biotech company, genentech, here in san francisco. he and his partners launched genentech in 1976 with nothing more than a checkbook and an idea. >> the idea was to trick nature into letting us make something that didn't exist in nature -- in particular, human insulin. >> genentech's success led to new ways of treating everything from diabetes to dwarfism, and to getting rich. kleiner perkins' initial investment of $250,000 soared 800-fold to $200 million. >> that's what venture capitalists are created to do, and you can blame converting the orchards of silicon valley into parking lots partly on me and partly on genentech, because we proved that this kind of high-risk, high-tech venture capital could be an enormous home run, and everybody wanted to get in on it, including lots of entrepreneurs, and that's what go
the constitution, myself. i'm reasonably well educated. and i thank you for the lecture. >> well, there you have it. this is the face of the new republican right. they basically are for everyone having a gun whenever they want it. in fact, they encourage you have to a gun. >> they have no shame, to go back to the mccarthy period. and i think senator cruz is one of those individuals. i mean, i think he'll demagogue this issue and it plays well for his constituency. and he -- you know, i think he might even believe some of this. >> let's take a look at the numbers here. you're familiar with this this. this is different between passion and effective politics. the people with passion on this issue tend to be the gun people. look at these numbers, though. if you look at the whole country, now. armed guards in schools, pretty close. what do you think of that 50%, 48%? >> it's an easy solution people think about. there are a lot of schools that have police officers. >> you don't have a big -- i don't either. what about this assault weapons ban? it's just about 57%, 3 out of 5. not a strong endorsement. >>
to change medicare into a voucher program, a dramatic cut in education, programs for children, medicaid, the health care program for poor people, and so it's hard to understand how they retreat from being really scary, and of course there's not going to be one penny of cuts to the wealthiest of americans tomorrow, and so being the stuffy old men, i kind of translate that into a rich and stuffy old, old men, and their solutions are absolutely ridiculous. i understand for young people they decided that they need to do more celebrity concerts and events. i'm wondering who they're going to get. maybe clint eastwood is really cool with the young people. >> i have a few ideas about that myself. dana before i give my ideas on their celebrity surrogates, you know, how do you mess with medicaid and medicare and think you're countering the image of being scary? and then, i mean, former bush campaign strategist matthew dowd, he compared the cpac gathering to a flintstones episode, listen to this. >>> yabba dabba do, they seem rather depressed, and actually the contingent woman had it right. they d
defense education loans i was in the peace corps, changed my lives. my father worked for the city of philadelphia. i have no problem with public service. that's where i'm at. that's how i got here. your party says that's degraded. i got a 47% because my father is on a g.i. bill and ended up on social security. what's wrong with government? >> look it -- >> good for most people. am i addicted to government? >> first of all, as a country, particularly to washington they're addicted to spending. we created this massive point -- >> you're on there. that's your winning -- you got the win card right there. >> manufacturing, obama says those jobs are gone forever. >> he does not say that, actually. >> when did he say that? >> president obama did not say that. >> we've got to admit those jobs are gone. >> no. >> some. >> he worked hard to bring back manufacturing. >> perhaps most typical -- let's get back to our report. reince priebus, it's about communication but the party never tried to stop to distant franchise, mainly poor african-american voters since the last election. stricter phot
% this year. how about apollo group? the for profit education company ripping higher. another name in the green. second quarter profit drops 79%. revenue fell amid lower enrollments. still, results besting the street's expectations. another name we should mention, dollar general, telling us today that sales growth this year could best the strength in 2012. but the company's rival, family dollar, actually slipping. analysts tell me part of the problem here, dollar general now saying it's roll out of tobacco products exceeding expectations. remember, family dollar got into the tobacco business about a year ago. so some worry now about the impact the company might feel. blackberry another name in the red. goldman sachs cutting its rating to neutral on this one. price target 17 bucks. the analysts talking about the disappointing u.s. launch of the new z-10 smartphone. we'll end here on facebook. falling to the lowest level this year, since trading at a six-month high of 32.51 on january 28th. facebook shares down some 20%. sue? back to you. >> thank you very much, josh. >>> we have les
amount of debt. it's not really certain. contesting the cost of education. this is a way that applies step you as a person. people are investing in you and whatever you do. and they have an incentive to help you succeed because they are sharing in that success. melissa: so you are saying that ii you change your mind about what you will be along the way that it does not necessarily impact what happens. and thinking about saying to someone, i will get out and be an investment banker. great. 10 percent of your 100,000, 200,000, three had a thousand whenever it will be. but the nevada site and i'm going to be a writer and i may start for five or eight years, have you broken the contract? >> i mean, i think great finance. i think it is a matter of day when you're investing in the person. you think they're passionate about something. the onus is on them to explain what they want to do and really demonstrate how pass that they are about something. i think that really influences the people investing. melissa: is not just a busted loans to raising money forever. >> i think this applies to, you
. spin off news corp education business and time warner publishing. a lot of companies have significant amount of cash, very solid balance sheet, returning capital to shareholders. international expansion is another theme. all told investors are really, very, very happy with the performance of these stocks over last several years consistently beating most of the major benchmarks. sandra: a stock we all watch often is netflix which i'm looking at which suffered a down day today. it is $181 a share. i wonder how they could possibly benefit from the move away from pay-tv services? >> netflix entered the fray to revolutionize the model, the traditional television model. taking people away from appointment viewing and trying to provide you content when you want it and how you want it. i think internet television is here to stay. it is pretty early to say that they're going to, you know, overtake traditional television anytime, soon. we think it is very complimentary. you've seen netflix and guys like disney and dreamworks animation strike what we consider to be potential ground breaking cont
where there is underemployment, nonfunctioning educational resources, people in need and in poverty and without hope where crime is high. i'm sure those were the things that he was concerned about, or at least some of them. i'm concerned about them as well. the problem is, is that there are no quick fixes to poverty and to educational systems that haven't worked for decades. we have to work on those things diligently, consistently and every day and that's what we're trying to do. >> mayor sly james, the most poised, calmest, coolest mayor on the planet. >> former marine. there's some marine training in there i have a feeling. >> thanks for joining us this morning. really appreciate it. >>> ahead on "starting point." take a look at this. it's all about guns in america as democrats drop the assault weapon ban. it says shame on us, assault weapons bill is dead. and senate vendors asurrenders wins. >>> adrian dantley from the street corner. yes, the nba hall of famer will tell us how he's giving back. and this is really a surprise. if youthen this willbrids arbe a nice surprise. meet th
in education, the infrastructure, the bridges and the tunnels. there's no money in the republican, because they say that we're taking care of revenues. where the heck that is in the constitution that you can't raise revenues, i don't know. but it's not right. >> i want to switch gears and talk to you about guns a bit. we just talked about it with our last group of folks. 85% of folks in this country when you ask about background checks they say they support the idea. background checks aren't a done deal. looks like the assault weapons ban is not going to happen. ban on high capacity clips is probably not going to happen. why is there such a, a gap between what folks say they want in terms of gun control and what you guys down in d.c. are willing to do? >> i may get trouble for this, but i don't think that 85% of americans have the slightest idea who their member of congress is or that they vote for them, or that short of their life depending on it, that they know how to get in touch with them in order to express their feelings. one thing is xleclear. the gun manufacturers and national rifl
to fund the job that makes them move to the better neighborhood, better education for the child, and it's harder for lower income americans to get the first job, gain skills and experience they need to climb the income ladder later in life. >> what's interesting, you know, the top 10% pays 70% of the income at the federal level. 1986 #, curtis, that was 55% of income. that income, that federal income into the coffers which congress continues to spend at will, frankly, has gone up for the top 10%. that includes small businesses. thank you very much for joining me on this issue. it affects a lot of people. >> thank you for having me. >> coming up tomorrow, we are going to continue our series. you are not going to want to miss friday's show, in particular, though, when i go one on one with gofer norquist the president of americans for tax reform. you know grover thinks, and he'll join me friday and the series, of course, continues all week long. grounding the american airlines, u.s. airways merger. a senate committee wrapping hearings on whether the airline tieup violates antitrust laws. m
and look at where we are with educational choice and our military positions and positions on a strong defense in our party for the most part, we agree on almost everyone and doesn't make someone a bad republican. it means we are good republicans and disagree on one or two things. my god. i don't agree with my wife on 100% of the issues but it doesn't mean we don't have a great marriage. i don't see how that is not -- that's not a reasonable position for people to take. i think it's entirely consistent. i think it's a human position to take and i think it's a decent position to take. >> mr. chairman, quickly. this is rich lawrie's column and he was writing this for politico. he said so much depends on the substance. no rebranding is going to make a difference if republican policy is not relevant to people's lives but the party desperately needs more than different marketing. our new political consultants are a few jack kerves and willing to ignore other drthodo we have to get out of this echo chamber, right? sometimes we can have different positions on background checks. we can have di
decision. he might bring up one, he might put in school safety issues because the education committee has actually done something on that. mental illness. but it's the beginning, chris. >> chris, he owes the people of america a vote. >> a vote. >> whether or not we pass something he owes the people of america a vote. he's certainly the families of victims he owes them a vote. and i belief the percolation we need to see so we finally get does sensible. >> in fact, he may be rolling the dice much less on this than in previous -- when he brought up the sandy he knew he would lose it when he brought up the fiscal cliff deal he knew he was going to lose that too. he may bring it up for a vote and, you know, there's not enough votes to sustain it in which he can look like a hero to everyone. thank you all for joining us this morning. >> thank you. >> obama news really after this. . but don't worry, he'll find someone else. ♪ who's that lady? ♪ who's that lady? ♪ sexy lady ♪ who's that lady? [ female announcer ] swiffer sweeper's electrostatic dry cloths attract and lock dirt, dust, and
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)